September 1, 2009

Indigo-a-GoGo: Dyeing with Jacquard (Giveaway}

A few years back, I took a dyeing class at Peters' Valley Craft Center where I learned the traditional Japanese resist-dyeing technique called shibori, and got to dye cloth in my first indigo dye vat. It was so much fun, and I've since taught the shibori technique to students in my classes.
Some of the samples I made while at Peters' Valley Craft Center
Jacquard, one of my favorite sources of high-quality dyes and fabric products, sent me one of their Indigo Dye Kits to review, and I'm quite pleased.
I've written about Jacquard products before, specifically the Funky Groovy Tie Dye kit, and I must say that Jacquard make a messy process like dyeing cloth as easy as possible.
The kit has everything you need to dye with indigo, except for buckets and fabric. It will dye up to 15 t-shirts and the dye can last for weeks if properly cared for.

Dyeing with indigo is a magical experience, literally! When you mix up the dye vat, it looks greenish yellow under the surface, but when you pull the fabric out, the dye starts to oxidize and turns the quintessential shade of blue that indigo is known for.
You can see some of the green areas in the dye, where oxygen hasn't penetrated the fabric yet.
I had some of the neighbor kids over to "help" me, and they loved the part where the fabric changed from neon green to dark blue.
Yes, that's Oscar cat, always nearby, waiting for attention.

I mentioned that I used some shibori techniques. Shibori is a Japanese resist dyeing method resist dyeing technique similar to tie-dye, where you create areas in the fabric that resist the dye. In tie-dye, it's done with rubber bands,
but in Japan, it's done with thread and can be done by stitching with a needle or tying. Some of the samples in the first photo were made by tediously stitching the fabric and then pulling it tight and knotting it. Those areas would remain white, as dye can't make its way into those spots. I went for the rubber bands instead.
You can also use a method of clamping using wood, called Itajime, where you fold a piece of cloth like an accordion
and then fold it into a square. You clamp it between two boards and secure with rope or rubber bands (these technique instructions and materials are included with the Jacquard Indigo Dye Kit)
The areas on the outside will be dyed, while the inside will remain white. You can see the result on the center scarf, the one with lots of white in it.
The circle patterns are made by gathering fabric in a point and tying it off with a rubber band.
In shibori, you can find extremely elaborate patterns with thousands of tiny circles no bigger than a grain of rice. They often form an image or pattern. Of course I don't have the patience for that.

The neighbor kids and I ended up dyeing 8 cotton t-shirts, 8 scarfs, a pair of socks, and a skein of wool yarn that will make a nice scarf/hat set.
There was so much dye left over too, that I neglected to save since I doubt I will be doing any more dyeing in the next week or so. But you can keep the dye for a while if you minimize contact with oxygen in the air. You would need to cover it with a lid.

Despite how long this post is, Jacquard's Indigo Dye Kit is extremely easy to use. I just love talking about dyeing, which is why I wrote lots of info here. The only drawback is that the directions for finishing the fabrics isn't clear. It just says rinse, which can be done but I wasn't sure if I could wash these or if I should add vinegar.

I ended up rinsing the yarn in the sink until the water ran clear, and running everything else through the washer a few times. The color still looks vibrant after rinsing, except for a few of the items the neighbor kids brought which weren't 100% cotton. Indigo works best on natural fibers.
So if you're looking for some interesting and educational fun, pick up a Jacquard Indigo Dye Kit, which is only $16.15 at Dharma Trading Company.

But if you want to try your luck, Jacquard is offering one K&K reader
An Indigo Dye Kit!
To enter:
Visit Jacquard and leave a comment about something you learned about the company or about indigo.
Extra Entries (leave a separate comment for each one):
  • Blog about this contest (2 entries--leave 2 comments)
  • Subscribe to my updates
  • Follow me on Blogger
  • Follow me on Twitter (Katydidandkid) and tweet this giveaway, leaving a link to your tweet in the comments. You can tweet once per day (leave a comment each day).
US Postal addresses only.
You must do the first entry in order to enter
("I want to win, thanks!" comments will NOT be considered). You will have until Sunday September 13th at 11:59pm EST to enter. The winners will be chosen via random number generator the next day and notified by email. I'll also post the winners on my blog HERE. If I don't hear back from the winner by Thursday at noon, I'll pick another.

116 comments:

  1. I visit their site almost daily! And use their fabric paints DAILY ;) I hope I win! I hope I win! Especially now that I have to "re-do" my dye project ;) Thanks for the great giveaway!!!

    Ash

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  2. I tweeted! http://twitter.com/lilblueboo and you've created a monster! Haha

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  3. Wow, beautiful! I passed on this review since I knew I wouldn't have time to use the kit, but your results made me jealous (just a little).
    I have an indigo dyed table cloth I bought in China several years ago.

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  4. I think it is great that this is a natural dye! I didn't realize that they were still using it for jeans! That's cool!

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  5. These pictures are beautiful! I love the colors and the patterns of your fabrics, and it's so fun to see you at work. Thanks for another fabulous dye post. :)

    Please enter me. ;) I learned that indigo works well for resist patterns. Hmmm! I see some indigo batiks in my future!

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  6. I learned that indigo dye comes from a plant and is one of the oldest dyes for coloring fabrics.

    bgcchs(at)yahoo(dot)com

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  7. I subscribe via email.

    bgcchs(at)yahoo(dot)com

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  8. They have almost 20 color lines
    throuthehaze at gmail dot com

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  9. subscriber
    throuthehaze at gmail dot com

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  10. follower
    throuthehaze at gmail dot com

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  11. I can tell you love what you do how passionately you speak about this :)

    I learned " Indigo dye, which comes from a plant, is one of the oldest dyes used for coloring fabrics and the one still used today to color blue jeans"

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  12. tweet

    http://twitter.com/Jamericanspice/statuses/3729674252

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  13. They also carry products for digital printing on fabric. cool!

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  14. You did a great job at presenting this review. :)

    It can dye up to 15 t-shirts.

    gahome2mom/at/gmail/dot/com

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  15. twitter @gahome2mom
    gahome2mom/at/gmail/dot/com

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  16. subscriber
    gahome2mom/at/gmail/dot/com

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  17. follower
    gahome2mom/at/gmail/dot/com

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  18. I learned that Jacquard Products have been around for 25 years! Thanks for entering me into this giveaway.
    unforgetable_dreamer_always(at)hotmail.com

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  19. Here's an interesting quote from the site. "With a resurgence of interest in indigo and ethnic patterning in the fashion world, this kit is sure to be a winner!" I didn't realize it was gaining popularity. Looks like a lot of fun though!!

    l baran @ pcsedu.com

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  20. I am an email subscriber

    lbaran @ pcsedu. com

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  21. I'd love the Marbling Kit!

    spitfyr323 at hotmail dot com

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  22. I'm an e-mail subscriber.

    spitfyr323 at hotmail dot com

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  23. I follow on Twitter and tweeted

    http://twitter.com/spitfyr323/status/3741609110

    spitfyr323 at hotmail dot com

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  24. I tweeted today! Increasing my winning odds ;)

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  25. indigo is one of the oldest dyes for coloring fabrics

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  26. tweeted http://twitter.com/cneiding/status/3749797724

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  27. Now I know that indigo dye comes from a plant and is one of the oldest dyes for coloring fabrics.

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  28. I like the Mehndi Henna Kit.
    traymona[at]aol.com

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  29. I learned that they have lots of unique products. I was disappointed to not find more information on the actual company on the website.

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  30. I learned you can dye about 15 shirts with this product. This would be a great way to redo my son's preschool uniform shirts that now have finger paints and markers on them. I think I could make some unique shirts for him to run around in after school and the weekend:)

    mscoffee77(AT)juno(DOT)com

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  31. I didn't know that Indigo dye comes from a plant and is used to color jeans! Thank you for the contest!
    txgigggles@yahoo.com

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  32. have 20 different color lines mverno@roadrunner.com

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  33. http://twitter.com/cneiding/status/3772462004 daily tweet

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  34. I learned that they have a gallery and you can see other people's creations.

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  35. http://twitter.com/cneiding/status/3792070553 tweet

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  36. i learned indigo is one of the oldest dyes

    nettysgirlATgmail.com

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  37. they've been in business 25 years.

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  38. i blogged about ya http://giveawaybuttonblog.blogspot.com/2009/09/explosion-of-indigo.html

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  39. I learned that indigo is a natural dye that comes from a plant.
    jedoggett@embarqmail.com

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  40. I follow
    jedoggett@embarqmail.com

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  41. http://twitter.com/cneiding/status/3833214287 daily tweet

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  42. http://twitter.com/cneiding/status/3855354972 daily tweet

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  43. Jacquard brings the ancient art of indigo dyeing to the home dyer in an easy to use kit.

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  44. http://twitter.com/cneiding/status/3877277286 daily tweet

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  45. Indigo dye, which comes from a plant, is one of the oldest dyes used for coloring fabrics and the one still used today to color blue jeans.

    Jennifer, jennem22 at yahoo dot com

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  46. What a great family project! I learned they have a marbling kit that also looks neat! thanks for the chance, justicecw@hotmail.com

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  47. I am an email subscriber
    justicecw@hotmail.com

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  48. I am a follower
    justicecw@hotmail.com

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  49. Following on twitter and tweeted at http://twitter.com/justicecw/status/3894805910
    justicecw@hotmail.com

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  50. Indigo is the dye used on blue jeans.

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  51. I learned that they have been in business for 25 years!
    jdkcdill@yahoo.com

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  52. follow on twitter and tweeted
    http://twitter.com/DIDIJOJO/status/3899632050
    jdkcdill@yahoo.com

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  53. I learned that the company offers TONS of different types of crafty kits. My kids would love them all! Me too! I think the Washi Paper Bracelets look really interesting.

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  54. Blogged: http://twitter.com/coriwestphal/statuses/3900542951

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  55. I learned that the dye kit is inteded to Dye up to 15 yards or 5 lbs. of fabric, or 15 t-shirts. Nice review!!

    msurosey@yahoo.com

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  56. http://twitter.com/cneiding/status/3902488259 daily tweet

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  57. I learned that indigo is a natural dye whose process has been used in many cultures around the world for centuries. I would love to try it, as I think indigo blue is one of the most beautiful colors.

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  58. daily tweet
    http://twitter.com/DIDIJOJO/status/3910881708
    jdkcdill@yahoo.com

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  59. 9/11 tweet at http://twitter.com/justicecw/status/3912503768
    justicecw@hotmail.com

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  60. daily tweet http://twitter.com/cneiding/status/3915922157

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  61. enter me thanks

    edq143 at yahoo dot com

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  62. I learned that indigo is a natural dye process that comes from a plant.

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  63. I tweeted: http://twitter.com/qwills2cats/status/3921494684

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  64. Dyes up to 15 yards or 5 lbs. of fabric, or 15 t-shirts. Dye bath lasts for several weeks. Includes everything you need except the fabric.

    denyse_g@hotmail.com

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  65. learned that indigo is one of the oldest dyes

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  66. 9/12 tweet at http://twitter.com/justicecw/status/3934525428
    justicecw@hotmail.com

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  67. I learned that Indigo comes from a plant and is used to color jeans. Thanks for the great giveaway.

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  68. I learned that when the air hits the dyed fabric it turns from bright green to the beautiful indigo color.



    sayos11 at yahoo dot com

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  69. Indigo dye comes from a plant! Very cool giveaway!

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  70. I learned that indigo is still used to dye denim. I thought most everything was dyed with procion dyes now.
    I love to tie dye, and have had an etsy shop selling tie dye for several years, but I've never tried indigo dyeing.
    iluvchrisnlevi@aol.com

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  71. daily tweet
    http://twitter.com/DIDIJOJO/status/3943292026
    jdkcdill@yahoo.com

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  72. I learned that Indigo is one of the oldest dye methods and is still used commerically as well. The Shibori bracelets also look interesting!

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  73. I learned on the website that Indigo dye, which comes from a plant, is one of the oldest dyes used for coloring fabrics and the one still used today to color blue jeans.

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  74. Indigo dye comes from a plant and is one of the oldest dyes for coloring fabrics :)

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  75. I learned that Indigo dye is one of the oldest kinds of dye used and comes from a plant!

    Megan

    m_zuchowski@hotmail.com

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  76. follow u on twitter and tweeted @momsfocus

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  77. I learned that "Indigo dye, which comes from a plant, is one of the oldest dyes used for coloring fabrics and the one still used today to color blue jeans." That makes sense, but I had no idea!

    xpsundell at gmail dot com

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  78. I'm following you on blogger now... although I could have sworn I already was!

    xpsundell at gmail dot com

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  79. I follow on twitter and tweeted!
    http://twitter.com/thxmailcarrier/status/3954714917

    xpsundell at gmail dot com

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  80. I like the idea of the transfer papers. THank you

    candieluster(at)gmail(dot)com

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  81. 9/13 tweet at http://twitter.com/justicecw/status/3958841385
    justicecw@hotmail.com

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  82. I learned you can dye about 15 shirts with this product. Very cool, enough for my whole family to have 3 each...nice

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  83. I like that the mixed dye will last several weeks!

    hanovertomato at yahoo dot com

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  84. http://twitter.com/cneiding/status/3968384906tweeted

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  85. I learned that indigo which comes froma plant is one of the oldest dyes used to color clothes and is used in blue jeans. garrettsambo@aol.com

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  86. I love this I would love to try it with my kids and make matching family shirts plus the mixed dye lasts a few weeks thanks for the chance to win eaglesforjack@gmail.com

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  87. i follow your blog thanks for the chance to win eaglesforjack@gmail.com

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  88. Indigo dye, which comes from a plant, is one of the oldest dyes used for coloring fabrics and the one still used today to color blue jeans.
    donna444444@yahoo.com

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  89. subscriber
    donna444444@yahoo.com

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  90. I learned that they've been in business for 25 years.

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  91. They have almost 20 color lines this is great

    ReplyDelete
  92. daily tweet
    http://twitter.com/DIDIJOJO/status/3980166898
    jdkcdill@yahoo.com

    ReplyDelete

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